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Epic Illustrated #2 Richard Corben cover

Epic Illustrated #2 cgc 9.8 Richard Corben cover Epic Illustrated was a comics anthology in magazine format published in the United States by Marvel Comics. The series lasted for 34 issues, from Spring 1980 to February 1986.

Epic Illustrated #16 Barry Windsor-Smith cover

Epic Illustrated #2 cgc SS 9.8 signed by Barry Windsor-Smith Epic Illustrated was a comics anthology in magazine format published in the United States by Marvel Comics. The series lasted for 34 issues, from Spring 1980 to February 1986.

Deadliest Heroes of Kung Fu #1

The Deadliest Heroes of Kung Fu #1 CGC 9.8 This unique book ran without a single advertisement in its pages. Bruce Lee, David Carradine and instructional features by Frank McLaughlin. Bruce Lee "Enter the Dragon" filmbook, pin-up, and photos. Features a four page article and photos from the "Kung Fu" television series. Earl Norem cover featuring David Carradine vs. Bruce Lee. In the summer of 1975, Curtis (Marvel) published one issue of The Deadliest Heroes of Kung Fu, a martial arts magazine with no comic book elements. Instead, The Deadliest Heroes of Kung Fu contained instructional features by comics illustrator/martial artist Frank McLaughlin. The magazine also had the distinction of not having a single advertisement within its pages. Editor John Warner explained in the magazine's editorial page that the extended reprint — a discussion of the film Enter the Dragon originally published in three parts in Curtis's Deadly Hands of Kung Fu — allowed the magazine to go without ads. Warner's editorial also posited that The Deadliest Heroes of Kung Fu was a trial balloon for an all-articles companion to Deadly Hands, but it is generally believed that a page- count cutback across Marvel's black-and-white magazine line came entirely out of the article section for Hands, leading to an inventory backlog, which this one-shot cleared.

Savage Tales #1 1971

The first Savage Tales ran May 1971. It marked Marvel's second attempt at entering the comics-magazine field dominated by Warren Publishing (Creepy, Eerie, Vampirella), this followed the two-issue superhero first attempt; The Spectacular Spider-Man in 1968. First issue stories were; The Frost Giant's Daughter; Robert E. Howard's sword and sorcery pulp-fiction character Conan the Barbarian, adapted by writer Roy Thomas and artist Barry Windsor-Smith (as Barry Smith); The Fury of the Femizons; the futuristic, Amazon-like Femizons, by writer-editor Stan Lee and artist John Romita;  The Origin of the Man-Thing; the swamp creature Man-Thing, plotted by Lee and Thomas, scripted by Gerry Conway and drawn by Gray Morrow;  Joshua's Burden; the African-American inner-city defender Joshua, in the feature "Black Brother" by Dennis O'Neil (under the pseudonym Sergius O'Shaughnessy) and penciler Gene Colan; The Night of the Looter; the jungle lord Ka-Zar, by Lee and artist John Buscema.